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School of Education at the University of Wisconsin-Madison

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WCER - Celebrating 50 years
View lectures, photos and an overview of our celebration.

FEATURE STORIES

Oleson, Hora and Benbow Seek Definition of ‘STEM job’

Students entering college generally have an idea that studying science, technology, engineering, or math – the STEM disciplines – can lead to a good-paying job after they graduate. But varying definitions of what exactly qualifies as a STEM career can be misleading not just to students, but also to researchers and economists who study the state of the U.S. economy and predict future occupational needs, according to WCER researcher Amanda Oleson.

In studying recent research and economic reports from sources as varied as the Bureau of Labor Statistics, O*Net occupation information network, National Science Foundation, the Brookings Institution and the Georgetown Center on Education and the Workforce, Oleson and colleagues Matthew Hora and Ross Benbow found that estimates for the number of STEM jobs in the U.S. vary wildly, from a low of 5.4 million jobs to a high of 26 million. These estimates differ due to whether certain occupations in healthcare and the social sciences are included, as well as if jobs that require varying levels of STEM skills or education, such as doctoral-level quality control engineers or frontline factory workers, are included. Read more

New look at school discipline confronts Wisconsin’s opportunities gap

Across the nation, from kindergarten through high school, black, Native American and Latino students in public schools are disciplined more frequently and severely for more subjective reasons than their white peers, according to UW-Madison’s Aydin Bal. Punishments often involve trips to the principal’s office and may lead to detention, suspension or even expulsion – all actions that remove the students in question from instructional environments.

Bal, an assistant professor with the Department of Rehabilitation Psychology and Special Education, and a researcher with the Wisconsin Center for Education Research, said it’s also a fact that white and wealthy students in the U.S. are much more likely to receive a superior education, more social opportunities and better academic outcomes than minority students, a discrepancy known as the “opportunity gap” or “achievement gap.” That gap is exceptionally large in Wisconsin, where white children are six times more likely to be proficient in eighth grade math than black students. Read more

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EVENTS & PRESS

Press

Chapel Hill-Carrboro City Schools work with MSAN to narrow the suspension gap
(Chapel Hill News, 5 December)

Northwestern is modeling its academy on the Entering Mentoring training curriculum developed at UW-Madison
(GEN News, 25 Nov.)

Beth Graue says smaller classes work best when teachers tailor instruction to each student’s needs and when they spend more time getting to know their students’ families (Albuquerque Journal, 25 Nov.)

Sun Prairie Students reflect on their experience at the MSAN 2014 conference (The Star, 19 Nov)

Interdisciplinary Training Program fellow Jared Knowles explains Wisconsin's Early Warning System for preventing dropouts (Marketplace, 12 Nov)

CIRTL is working to make science, technology, engineering and math degrees and careers more interesting to today's college students (Inside Philanthropy, Nov. 5)

 


CENTER SITES

Center for the Integration of Research, Teaching, and LearningCenter for the Integration of Research, Teaching, and Learning

Center on Education and Work

Children, Families & SchoolsChildren, Families & Schools

CRPBISCulturally Responsive Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports

Consortium for Policy Research in EducationConsortium for Policy Research in Education

CALLComprehensive Assessment of Leadership for Learning

CCHERCulture, Cognition, and Evaluation of STEM Higher Education Reform

Epistemic GamesEpistemic
Games Group

Exploring the alignment between workforce and education

Formative Language Assessment Records for ELLs in Secondary Schools

ILDLInteractive Learning & Design Lab

Interdisciplinary ITPTraining Program in the Education Sciences

Investing in Family Engagement

LSFFLongitudinal Study of Future STEM Scholars

Mobilizing STEM for a Sustainable FutureMobilizing STEM for a Sustainable Future

Minority Student Achievement NetworkMinority Student
Achievement Network

ONPARONPAR Assessment

PhillyFAST-i3PhillyFAST-i3


Strategic Management of Human CapitalStrategic Management of Human Capital

Surveys of Enacted CurriculumSurveys of Enacted Curriculum

System-wide Change for All Learners and EducatorsSystem-wide Change for All Learners and Educators

Talking About Leaving, Revisited

TDOP: Teaching Dimensions Observation Protocol

TransanaTracking the Processes of Data Driven Decision-Making in Higher Education

TransanaTransana

Value-Added Research CenterValue-Added Research Center

WIDA ConsortiumWIDA Consortium

WeilabWisconsin's Equity and Inclusion Laboratory

WCER NEWS

WIDA Researchers Meet with Alaskan Native Educators

As part of a new initiative at WIDA to study the ways the organization can serve American Indian communities, WIDA researchers Rosalie Grant and Paula White traveled to Alaska for the 2014 National Indian Education Association (NIEA) Convention and to meet with educators working in schools that primarily serve Alaska’s American Indian population. Both Grant and White received WCER Professional Development grants to attend and participate in the NIEA. Read more

WCER’s 50th Anniversary: A Celebration for Staff, Researchers, Colleagues, Students and Family

WCER recognized its 50th anniversary on October 20, 2014, with a celebration offering something for everybody – WCER researchers, staff, colleagues, students and family. Read more

Three UW-Madison Scholars, Including Winner Shoji, Among Five Finalists for CUNY Research in Education Equity Award

Three UW-Madison scholars, all fellows in WCER’s Interdisciplinary Training Program (ITP) in the Education Sciences, were named finalists in a recent national competition with one, Megan Shoji, winning the first prize and an award of $2,500. Read more