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School of Education at the University of Wisconsin-Madison

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WCER - Celebrating 50 years
View lectures, photos and an overview of our celebration.

FEATURE STORIES

Dual-Credit Courses Improve College Access and Success

Dual-credit courses allow high school juniors and seniors to enroll in a college course and earn simultaneous credit in high school and college. Earning college credits before graduating from high school makes the transition to college smoother and can increase the likelihood of success there and in the workforce.

So it’s not surprising that dual-credit courses are popular. In 2011, 76% of U.S. high schools reported that some students took at least one dual enrollment course with an academic focus, while 46% of high schools reported students completing dual enrollment courses with a career-technical education focus.

Students who particularly benefit from those courses are those who live in or near manufacturing centers like Wisconsin’s Fox Cities region. Its three counties employ manufacturing workers at two to three times the national average. The area is home to APPVION, for example, which produces thermal papers and films for receipts and coupons, lottery tickets, and medical charts. Pierce Manufacturing and Oshkosh Defense manufacture tactical vehicles for the armed forces. Plexus Corporation produces missile systems, thermal imaging equipment, and sensors for sonar and radar. Read more

Oleson, Hora and Benbow Seek Definition of ‘STEM job’

Students entering college generally have an idea that studying science, technology, engineering, or math – the STEM disciplines – can lead to a good-paying job after they graduate. But varying definitions of what exactly qualifies as a STEM career can be misleading not just to students, but also to researchers and economists who study the state of the U.S. economy and predict future occupational needs, according to WCER researcher Amanda Oleson.

In studying recent research and economic reports from sources as varied as the Bureau of Labor Statistics, O*Net occupation information network, National Science Foundation, the Brookings Institution and the Georgetown Center on Education and the Workforce, Oleson and colleagues Matthew Hora and Ross Benbow found that estimates for the number of STEM jobs in the U.S. vary wildly, from a low of 5.4 million jobs to a high of 26 million. These estimates differ due to whether certain occupations in healthcare and the social sciences are included, as well as if jobs that require varying levels of STEM skills or education, such as doctoral-level quality control engineers or frontline factory workers, are included. Read more

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EVENTS & PRESS

Press

Chapel Hill-Carrboro City Schools work with MSAN to narrow the suspension gap
(Chapel Hill News, 5 December)

Northwestern is modeling its academy on the Entering Mentoring training curriculum developed at UW-Madison
(GEN News, 25 Nov.)

Beth Graue says smaller classes work best when teachers tailor instruction to each student’s needs and when they spend more time getting to know their students’ families (Albuquerque Journal, 25 Nov.)

Sun Prairie Students reflect on their experience at the MSAN 2014 conference (The Star, 19 Nov)

Interdisciplinary Training Program fellow Jared Knowles explains Wisconsin's Early Warning System for preventing dropouts (Marketplace, 12 Nov)

CIRTL is working to make science, technology, engineering and math degrees and careers more interesting to today's college students (Inside Philanthropy, Nov. 5)

 


CENTER SITES

Center for the Integration of Research, Teaching, and LearningCenter for the Integration of Research, Teaching, and Learning

Center on Education and Work

Children, Families & SchoolsChildren, Families & Schools

CRPBISCulturally Responsive Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports

Consortium for Policy Research in EducationConsortium for Policy Research in Education

CALLComprehensive Assessment of Leadership for Learning

CCHERCulture, Cognition, and Evaluation of STEM Higher Education Reform

Epistemic GamesEpistemic
Games Group

Exploring the alignment between workforce and education

Formative Language Assessment Records for ELLs in Secondary Schools

ILDLInteractive Learning & Design Lab

Interdisciplinary ITPTraining Program in the Education Sciences

Investing in Family Engagement

LSFFLongitudinal Study of Future STEM Scholars

Mobilizing STEM for a Sustainable FutureMobilizing STEM for a Sustainable Future

Minority Student Achievement NetworkMinority Student
Achievement Network

ONPARONPAR Assessment

PhillyFAST-i3PhillyFAST-i3


Strategic Management of Human CapitalStrategic Management of Human Capital

Surveys of Enacted CurriculumSurveys of Enacted Curriculum

System-wide Change for All Learners and EducatorsSystem-wide Change for All Learners and Educators

Talking About Leaving, Revisited

TDOP: Teaching Dimensions Observation Protocol

TransanaTracking the Processes of Data Driven Decision-Making in Higher Education

TransanaTransana

Value-Added Research CenterValue-Added Research Center

WIDA ConsortiumWIDA Consortium

WeilabWisconsin's Equity and Inclusion Laboratory

WCER NEWS

Philosophy Professors Start New WCER Interdisciplinary Center for Ethics and Education

What are the purposes of public education? Are they the right kinds of purposes now, and were they the right kinds of purposes 50 years ago? 

Questions like this will be addressed by WCER’s new interdisciplinary Center for Ethics and Education, codirected by Harry Brighouse, a philosophy professor and an affiliate professor of educational policy studies at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, and Anthony Laden, a professor of philosophy at the University of Illinois at Chicago. Read more

WIDA Researchers Meet with Alaskan Native Educators

As part of a new initiative at WIDA to study the ways the organization can serve American Indian communities, WIDA researchers Rosalie Grant and Paula White traveled to Alaska for the 2014 National Indian Education Association (NIEA) Convention and to meet with educators working in schools that primarily serve Alaska’s American Indian population. Both Grant and White received WCER Professional Development grants to attend and participate in the NIEA. Read more